DO YOU KNOW THE NEW PENALTIES SMSF TRUSTEES AND DIRECTORS FACE?

Industry and retail superannuation funds have been in the spotlight now for many months as the federal government tries to get their proposed legislative changes through parliament. These changes include the possibility of jail terms of up to five years for super fund directors who contravene the rules governing the fund.

Currently, this behaviour is not an offence and does not attract a criminal or civil penalty. The proposed changes would see the fund possibly subject to a civil penalty, which could then result in both civil and criminal consequences. For serious breaches of a director’s duty, a criminal offence and jail time is proposed.

These proposed changes affect directors of industry and retail funds, but are there any changes taking place that affect self-managed superannuation fund (SMSF) trustees and directors? Yes, there are, and they are already impacting on the SMSF industry.

For example, harsher fines have been in place since the beginning of the 2017/2018 financial year, with the value of a penalty unit increasing to $210 since 1 July 2017. What are penalty units? This is the amount of money under Australian law that is used to calculate penalties for breaches of statute law. It is easier to change the number of penalty units each year than it is to amend legislation to increase penalties.

SMSF trustees need to understand how penalty units work, as they must operate their fund according to superannuation rules. If they break those rules, financial penalties may be the result. A breach of certain rules means an automatic administrative penalty ranging from $1,050 up to $12,600, depending on the type of breach.

Three types of new penalties have been imposed. One is a requirement to improve a trustee’s knowledge through education by taking a course by a certain time. Failure to do this will incur a financial penalty. The second is to correct any breaches of the rules within a specific time frame. In both cases, evidence must be provided to the ATO to prove that corrective action has been taken.

The third is the administrative penalty already mentioned and it is the most significant. Fines will be applied to each trustee separately, so if there are two trustees, the fine must be paid by each individual trustee, for the same amount, effectively doubling the amount of money to be paid. If the SMSF has a corporate trustee, the directors are jointly and severally liable to pay just one penalty amount.

These fines must be paid by the trustees or directors themselves and cannot be reimbursed back to them out of the SMSF funds. The consequences of overlooking an administrative responsibility are now significant, so using a specialist such as SMSF Assure to handle all administrative and compliance matters makes more sense than ever.

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