How to Check If All Your SMSF Admin Is Ready For The EOFY

If you are the trustee of a self-managed superannuation fund (SMSF), especially a newly established one, you may be approaching the new tax year with some trepidation. It starts, of course, on 1 July and it means that you should be preparing to lodge your annual return for the previous tax year.

Since one of the major benefits of operating an SMSF is the tax concessions available, it makes sense that trustees would ensure all administrative tasks, including the SMSF annual return, are completed on time. Trustees are liable to pay tax on the taxable income of the fund from the fund assets. This tax liability is advised to the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) through the annual return already mentioned. There is no separate SMSF tax return similar to others such as the tax return for individuals or the company tax return.

There are quite a few steps in the process of gathering the information needed to complete this annual return. It would be useful for the inexperienced fund trustee to make a checklist of the tasks required, starting with appointing an approved SMSF auditor not more than 45 days before the SMSF annual return due date. Add to the checklist the reminder that they may also require an actuarial certificate.

A well-managed fund should have its financial records up to date, which will make preparing the end of financial year accounts and statements a simple matter. The trustee should also have paid any minimum annual income stream payments required under superannuation laws. These tasks should be included on your checklist.

The trustee will also need to provide a market valuation of the assets of the fund as at 30 June, and also review the fund’s investment strategy and document the review. Again, these two items need to go onto the checklist.

Some fund trustees will be required to lodge transfer balance reports, so SMSF trustees need to check whether or not this applies to their fund situation and add this to the checklist if necessary.

The final two items may seem obvious, but it doesn’t hurt to be reminded by placing them on the checklist. Make sure the SMSF annual return is lodged by the due date and check that all fund records have been maintained as required under superannuation laws.

Successfully managing the entire end of financial year tasks is a big responsibility for fund trustees who have other financial responsibilities outside of their SMSF. Most trustees have now found that the end of the financial year is not to be feared when they partner with companies such as SMSF Assure to help them manage their administration responsibilities.

ARE YOU STRUGGLING WITH YOUR SMSF REPORTING REQUIREMENTS?

One of the main reasons for the popularity of SMSFs (self-managed superannuation funds) is that the fund members can make their own investment decisions as opposed to putting their money into retail funds and having no such control. Of course, this requires the trustees, who are also the members, to have a reasonable understanding of investment options and strategies.

The purpose of the fund is to accumulate savings for retirement, so it is a big responsibility and a major financial decision requiring specific skills and the time to manage the fund properly. It also involves a high level of reporting to the ATO (Australian Taxation Office) and this reporting must be done in an approved manner and within set timelines.

Along with the responsibility of making investment decisions comes the requirement to prepare regular reports, which is also time consuming. These reports must be accurate and lodged on time or attract a penalty from the ATO for non-compliance.

SMSFs must be audited every year and once the audit is finalised, the trustee must lodge an annual return with the ATO. This return is more than just a tax return. It is also used to report on a range of other matters such as superannuation regulatory information and member contributions.

While the tax return part of this reporting is a regular occurrence, the other matters are just some of the special reports that a trustee will be expected to complete at some point in the life of their SMSF. A recent addition that commenced on 1 July 2018 is the event-based reporting framework (EBR) for SMSFs.

This framework is used by the ATO to administer the transfer balance cap and is required to be completed by a trustee when their first member starts a retirement phase income stream. The actual report is called a Transfer Balance Account Report and it is separate from the annual return. The ATO uses this report to track an individual’s balance for both their transfer balance cap and total superannuation balance.

There are a number of events that affect a member’s transfer balance and all or any of these events must be reported to the ATO. There are specific instructions to follow regarding when and how this reporting must be done and timeframes for reporting are determined by the total superannuation balances of the SMSF members.

As the level of reporting required by the ATO becomes more complex, many SMSF trustees are looking for ways to improve their business reports to ensure they are accurate and lodged when they are required and in the required format. Trustees are also realising that as the reporting requirements increase, they have less time for managing their investment portfolios.

This has led to an increase in demand for the assistance of companies such as SMSF Assure. These companies are specialists in SMSF administration and are often operated by qualified accountants and other staff with the experience and skills to help trustees manage their administration and reporting responsibilities.

If you are a trustee struggling with your reporting, seeking the expertise of one of these companies is the best and quickest way to improve your business reports and keep your fund compliant with ATO requirements and regulations.

SUPERANNUATION TAX CONCESSIONS ENCOURAGE GROWTH IN RETIREMENT SAVINGS

Since the first self managed superannuation funds (SMSFs) were established, this sector of the financial services industry has seen steady growth year after year. The latest Australian Taxation Office (ATO) figures show that there are now over 600,000 SMSFs managing the retirement savings of more than 1.1 million Australians.

There are several benefits to establishing an SMSF, including the amount of control the trustees have over their investments when compared to industry and retail superannuation funds. However, the major benefit is the generous tax concessions that compliant SMSFs can access.

For example, SMSFs that comply with the superannuation legislation have their member contributions and fund earnings taxed at the concessional rate of 15% in Australia. This is called the accumulation phase. Once you are over 60 years of age you can access your superannuation tax free, but if you move your super into retirement phase to get a pension rather than taking it as a lump sum, the earnings on the investments supporting your income stream are also tax-free.

Of course, there are rules and conditions attached to achieving this tax-free status for eligible SMSF members, and not understanding or complying with these rules and conditions could see you jeopardise this key benefit. The tax exemption on earnings in retirement phase is called exempt current pension income (ECPI), and you must claim it correctly or miss out.

ECPI is claimed in your SMSF’s annual return when your fund starts paying one or more retirement phase income streams. There are two methods that can be used, the segregated method and the proportionate method. Where the SMSF’s assets supporting retirement income streams are clearly held separate from any other assets, the segregated method should be used.

The proportionate method is used where the SMSF does not set aside specific assets to support retirement income streams and it is the one most commonly used by SMSFs. This method applies when the fund has a member or members in both the accumulation and the retirement phase, and the assets have not been segregated but are all pooled in together.

An actuarial certificate is required from an actuary who calculates the exempt proportion and applies it to income earned in that period, which forms part of the fund’s total ECPI for the year. This is a complex area that can easily confuse fund trustees who are more conversant with investment strategies than they are with actuarial calculations.

Many trustees engage companies such as SMSF Assure to help them navigate the complex administration and reporting requirements of running an SMSF. There are several more issues involved in calculating a fund’s ECPI other than those already mentioned. Getting additional professional expertise for these calculations is preferable to making a mistake and suffering a financial penalty.

The lure of a tax-free status in retirement has been a large part of the growth of SMSFs. Successive federal governments have encouraged this growth so that working Australians can provide for their own retirement rather than rely on the government-funded Aged Pension. Superannuation is one of the best vehicles Australians have to reduce their tax payments while creating wealth for their retirement.

ASK THE RIGHT QUESTIONS BEFORE STARTING YOUR SMSF

Self-managed superannuation funds (SMSFs) continue to attract interest from potential fund trustees eager to make the leap into taking control of their own retirement income. The problem that many of them face is in knowing what questions to ask and where to go to find the answers. To get them started, the most important information they need to know is how to go about setting it up.

At the start, many people assume that there is only one way to structure their fund, so when they find out differently, the first question they ask is about the differences between two options. They then find that the first option is to have individual trustees and the other is to establish a company acting as trustee for the fund. Both of these options should be discussed with a professional before making any decision, as they are difficult to change later.

The next question to be asked, naturally enough, is usually about costs. They find that there are no Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) fees for a fund with individual trustees, resulting in reduced establishments costs and lower ongoing administrative requirements. However, ASIC charges a fee for the initial registration of a corporate trustee, followed by annual review fees. In the case of both structures, trustees or directors cannot be paid fees for their duties or services relative to the fund.

The ownership of the fund assets is often the next question asked. For an SMSF with individual trustees, the title of the fund assets must be in the name of the current trustees, “as trustees” for the fund. If the trustees change, then the titles must also be changed, which can be expensive. In the case of a corporate trustee, when a person leaves the fund, they cease to be a director and although ASIC must be notified of the change of directors, the titles of the assets remain unchanged.

Often, potential trustees already hold personal assets that are not intended to be part of the fund. They want to know before going any further what will happen to those assets. The answer to this question is quite simple. The assets of the fund must be kept completely separate from any personal assets held by the trustees. The fund assets must be in the name of the fund. Corporate assets are exactly the same except that companies have limited liability.

Finally, the question of penalties for non-compliance arises. Trustees must always be mindful that if superannuation laws are breached, each trustee is liable individually for the administrative penalties. If the same penalties were to be levied on a corporate trustee, they would only be applied once.

There are many other questions to be asked and answered in much more detail than is possible here. Suffice to say that there are companies such as SMSF Assure that will assist trustees with all the administrative details involved in running an SMSF, so they are in a perfect position to give complete and comprehensive answers to these questions.

ORGANISING YOUR SUPER FUND – THE KEY STEPS

If you have a good understanding of the mechanics of superannuation and a flair for spotting a good investment, you may be thinking about establishing your own SMSF. The initial organisation is not particularly difficult, especially as all the steps required are set out clearly by the ATO (Australian Taxation Office).

However, getting it right is important because only a compliant fund is eligible for tax concessions and it can receive contributions. You could engage SMSF professionals to help you set up the fund but if you prefer to organise the fund yourself, there are important things you must do.

The first thing you must do is choose between having individual trustees or a corporate trustee, each of which differs in terms of the member and trustee requirement, costs, ownership and separation of the fund assets, penalties and succession. These are all critical decisions, which, once made, are very difficult to change.

Next is to choose your eligible trustees or directors, depending on which fund structure you choose. All trustees and directors must consent in writing to their appointment and sign the Trustee declaration. You must keep these documents secure for the life of the SMSF and for ten years after it is wound up.

Now you must create a trust deed; this is the legal document that establishes the rules by which the trust is managed. This must be prepared by someone with the relevant legal qualifications. There must also be a nominal initial contribution of assets to give legal effect to the fund.

Within 60 days of signing the trustee declaration, you must register the SMSF with the ATO by applying for an ABN (Australian Business Number). Now you can open a bank account in the fund’s name. This account will be used to manage the fund operations.

You may also need an electronic service address, which is a special internet address that is different to an email address. Finally, even at the start of this venture, you will also need an exit strategy. Such a strategy reduces the effects of an unexpected event such as a death, a relationship breakdown between the trustees or some other occurrence.

If you still want to go ahead with the SMSF but daunted by the prospect of the day-to-detail now that you have a taste of what is involved, all that is needed is to enlist the assistance of companies such as SMSF Assure to do the administration, while you divert your energies to building a retirement nest egg.

Now think carefully before you decide to go it alone. Many important decisions are needed that can be provided by a range of professions covering accounting, administration, legal, financial and tax advice. Not using their expertise could have a huge impact over your final retirement balance.