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ARE YOU STRUGGLING WITH YOUR SMSF REPORTING REQUIREMENTS?

One of the main reasons for the popularity of SMSFs (self-managed superannuation funds) is that the fund members can make their own investment decisions as opposed to putting their money into retail funds and having no such control. Of course, this requires the trustees, who are also the members, to have a reasonable understanding of investment options and strategies.

The purpose of the fund is to accumulate savings for retirement, so it is a big responsibility and a major financial decision requiring specific skills and the time to manage the fund properly. It also involves a high level of reporting to the ATO (Australian Taxation Office) and this reporting must be done in an approved manner and within set timelines.

Along with the responsibility of making investment decisions comes the requirement to prepare regular reports, which is also time consuming. These reports must be accurate and lodged on time or attract a penalty from the ATO for non-compliance.

SMSFs must be audited every year and once the audit is finalised, the trustee must lodge an annual return with the ATO. This return is more than just a tax return. It is also used to report on a range of other matters such as superannuation regulatory information and member contributions.

While the tax return part of this reporting is a regular occurrence, the other matters are just some of the special reports that a trustee will be expected to complete at some point in the life of their SMSF. A recent addition that commenced on 1 July 2018 is the event-based reporting framework (EBR) for SMSFs.

This framework is used by the ATO to administer the transfer balance cap and is required to be completed by a trustee when their first member starts a retirement phase income stream. The actual report is called a Transfer Balance Account Report and it is separate from the annual return. The ATO uses this report to track an individual’s balance for both their transfer balance cap and total superannuation balance.

There are a number of events that affect a member’s transfer balance and all or any of these events must be reported to the ATO. There are specific instructions to follow regarding when and how this reporting must be done and timeframes for reporting are determined by the total superannuation balances of the SMSF members.

As the level of reporting required by the ATO becomes more complex, many SMSF trustees are looking for ways to improve their business reports to ensure they are accurate and lodged when they are required and in the required format. Trustees are also realising that as the reporting requirements increase, they have less time for managing their investment portfolios.

This has led to an increase in demand for the assistance of companies such as SMSF Assure. These companies are specialists in SMSF administration and are often operated by qualified accountants and other staff with the experience and skills to help trustees manage their administration and reporting responsibilities.

If you are a trustee struggling with your reporting, seeking the expertise of one of these companies is the best and quickest way to improve your business reports and keep your fund compliant with ATO requirements and regulations.

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